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3 QUICK WORDS TOWARDS SAFETY AND HEALTH PLANNING

 

It all starts from here:

When we train people how to understand legal and moral duties for managing occupational safety, health and welfare it can all be very overwealming. But what if it was possible to break things down into manageable chunks?  Suddenly things begin to make a little more sense and easier to plan and implement. Here is an example of one of the ways you can do this.

All workplaces by law have to have plans for what we will call here, health and safety. No, not the elf'n-safety with the bad reputation for stupidity. The proper occupational health, safety and welfare we should all understand and trust. The problem is; where to start and what needs to be done? From there, things can take an odered route, taking account of priorities.

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 As can be seen, if you first think stategy; who is involved, what should be acheived, what might a policy might need to include and so on, you will have already have made a great inroad towards you goals.

 The next is to think  predictive. For this purpose, this means thinking things out and drawing up plans to ensure the safety and health of those concerned. PLANNING is the key word here, meaning, not left to chance. Planning is the process of looking at what might happen - hazards. Then looking at what the adverse consequences might be and how those effects can be minimised to an acceptable level. This is what is often known as undertaking risk assessments. But it also means creating plans for safety too. 

The last element for this purpose is that of dynamic planning. Sometimes circumstances change and our original intentions and plans need to change to take them into account. The default position is always that if our plans don't apply or need to be changed, we stop our activities if we have to do so in order to protect both health and safety of people. But we can and indeed should draw up new plans. And if they are both suitable and sufficient, our work can continue or re-start. 

 We hope this helps you to understand some of the legalities and to guide you towards with your own plans for safety, health and welfare. 

 

 If you need any help with your practical plans or training for safety, health or welfare, please just give us a call. We would be delighted to help.