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SERVICE AGREEMENT & IOSH CODE OF CONDUCT v 3rd November 2015

(The small-but-very-important print)

The Safety Organisation Terms and Conditions and IOSH Code of Conduct

We endeavour to ensure that our working and contractual arrangements are both fair and clear to our clients. Therefore we include below our base for terms and conditions, which is adapted to suit each client and / or contracted work. Also shown below is the Code of Conduct of the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health, which we are bound to as members. 

 

Important note

The document which is presented here is intended to assist potential clients by giving them an opportunity to review a specimen of our terms and conditions. The details within this document may change from time to time and the document and may vary from the below version, The terms and conditions document  to be produced to accompany actual contracted work may be amended to suit the needs of circumstances and will always take precedence.

IOSH Codes of Conduct follow on below our T & Cs.

PROVISION OF SERVICE AGREEMENT

(TERMS AND CONDITIONS)

 

 

Date:  --/--/----

Document Version;  3rd November 2015

RE : HSW Advisory & Support Services 

Parties: 

----------------------------- (client) 

“The Company”:

 

 

 

“The Safety and Health Management Advisors”:

The Safety and health Organisation Limited

Registered Office

14 Blacklow Brow

Huyton, Liverpool.

Registered in England no. 07343160.

VAT registration number, 0996024590

 

 

1. Appointment of  Safety and Health Management Advisors

The Company appoints the Safety and Health Management Advisors to provide Health, Safety and Welfare Advisory Services to The Company and the Safety and Health Management Advisors agree to provide such Advisory Services for the Duration of the Agreement upon the terms and conditions hereinafter mentioned. 

 

2. Advisory Services

a. The Advisory Services to be performed by the Safety and Health Management Advisors under this Agreement include:

i. Health, safety and welfare support requirements, as requested by The Company and confirmed in writing and agreed by each party on each various occasion.

ii. In relation to the provision Management Advice and Support services regarding all health, safety and health and welfare issues, services may be legitimately withdrawn or temporarily suspended their services without liability for exposure to adverse consequences if; 

by doing so, the action contravenes a higher priority such as  breach of laws or duties of care,

or by doing so, the service/s exceeds the agreed amount of time or other costs agreed,

iii. an insufficient number of advisors has been appointed for the task, due to either a change in circumstances, insufficient briefing information, adding further work, the over-running of work or similar circumstances, 

iv. or if the service is outside those agreed.

b. The Safety and Health Management Advisors specifically exclude any responsibility in law or for any duty of care arising from any adverse circumstances, including harm befalling any person, damage to property, financial losses and exposure to claims for any liability or for any prosecution under criminal legislation arising from the following circumstances.

i. Any work planned or undertaken by The Company, which is outside that, for which an agreement to provide Advisory services is agreed and where a full and proper consultation, advice and planning process has been able to take place. 

ii. Under the circumstances at 2.a.iii above, should any advice be sought from the Safety and Health Management Advisors, which relates to such formally agreed work, then it shall be assumed that the advice has been given in good faith without having a full awareness of all circumstances and therefore no liability will be accepted from any untoward occurrence of any kind.

iii. Late appointment for provision of services, whereby an insufficient opportunity to consult and advice has prevailed. This includes all circumstances from the consideration for the concept to completion of work and, where relevant; post completion analysis.

iv. Failure to provide sufficient information to the Safety and Health Management Advisors for any reason whatsoever.

v. Provision of incorrect information to the Safety and Health Management Advisors, or making changes to any previously supplied information or changing details under any circumstances without advising the Safety and Health Management Advisors of the intention to make such a change beforehand.

vi. Failure of any employee, or officer of the company, or of any person working for, or as agents for, or as contractors on the behalf of, or any suppliers for the company, to follow the advice provided by the Safety and Health Management Advisors, in whole or in part, whether the advice or information was verbally given or whether in writing. 

vii. For any circumstance, which might take place where, as a result, harm, loss or exposure to prosecution arises under circumstances, which are outside the direct control of, or whereby no opportunity to provide advice occurs. The Safety and Health Management Advisors will endeavour to provide a comprehensive service, subject to the terms of their appointment but they cannot be held responsible for any circumstances outside of that agreement, or agreed hours of service, or geographical limits, or for any circumstance whereby the practicability of management do not allow a continual presence in the area or immediate area of their direct influence, in whole or in part. For example, when providing on site direct advice, when in another building or part of a building, when taking breaks, when in meetings or any other similar circumstances of obligation, contractual agreement, other provision of service or when undertaking personal welfare requirements. 

viii. Failure to understand in whole or in part or failing in whole or in part, to put into operation the contents of any health, safety and health & welfare manuals or advice relating to any part of a such a manual.

ix. Failure to follow advice given by the Safety and Health Management Advisors relating in whole or in part to the operation or recording of safety and Health Management systems provided to them by any other means, including those relating to management, control, safe systems of work and management systems of their contractors, sub-contractors or other relevant parties. This will apply also in relation to the manners in which the safe systems mentioned in this section will also apply when a venue, space or workplace may be shared or otherwise involve a multi-occupancy status.

x. Failure to take advice or instructions or to have sufficient management systems in place to make sufficient arrangements for other persons affected by their work, including arrangements for safety and health outside of working hours and as they might relate also to crowd, audience or visitor safety and health.

xi. Failure to take specific account of or make arrangements for emergencies, evacuations and major incidents despite having received suitable advice from the Safety and Health Management Advisors.

xii. Failure to keep sufficient records or to failure to analyse and thereby act upon relevant information which might prevent further adverse circumstances, either in the short term or in the future as advised by the Safety and Health Management Advisors.

xiii. The Safety and Health Management Advisors at all times, explicitly and implicitly strongly advise that a culture for the promotion and development of health, safety, health and welfare is promoted and developed, including control systems, co-operation of all relevant parties, efficient communications in all respects and competency of staff. Thereby, all requirements relating to all aspects for the planning and management of health, safety and health and welfare of all concerned may be ensured. The Safety and Health Management Advisors recognise that they are not involved in all aspects of work undertaken by The Company, their staff, contractors and other relevant parties and they will only accept responsibility for any omissions or acts arising from circumstances from which they directly provided advice and that advice has been fully, meaningfully and diligently followed.

 

3. Areas of Safety and Health Management Advice Services specifically not covered

i. All working systems, safety and health processes and documentation which are required of The Company or their employees, agents or contractors outside of the terms of any specific current working agreement.

ii. Any acts or omissions, including inaccuracy, lateness or failure to supply documents or any other pertinent information to the Safety and Health Management Advisors, which are material to the purposes of such an agreement or for acts or omissions which amount to or may lead to breaches of laws or duties of care. Under any one of these circumstance, services may be withdrawn forthwith, without any prior warning and all monies due will become payable forthwith, as will any other monies which would have become due as if the work was to have been completed in full (see also s2.a.ii above and s 10.vi below).

 

4. Duration of the Agreement

The Agreement shall commence with immediate effect for services already commenced, pro-rata as at s6 and from the date of this agreement for residual services until work is completed or until this Agreement is terminated in accordance with s 8.

 

5. Safety and Health Management Advisors’ Obligations

For the Duration of the Agreement the Safety and Health Management Advisors shall:

i. Perform services broadly described as health, safety and health and welfare advisory services;

ii. Provide the services described relating to agreed work and for any other agreed and documented requirements. Other services may be provided from time to time, as may be agreed. They will fall under the provision of s9 below unless agreed and confirmed to the contrary in writing. 

iii. Fulfil their obligations in a professional and competent manner and to the best of their ability. 

 

6. Fee 

i. The Company shall pay to the Safety and Health Management Advisors a fee as agreed for specific services in a timely manner, as agreed. Late payments may be surcharged without notice under the terms of the Late Payment of Commercial Debts (Interests) Act 2002.

ii. Any duties and expenses beyond those at 6.1 above will be charged at the rates described at section 9 below.

iii. Unless stated to the contrary, the agreed period for Safety and Health Management Advisors’ services and for report writing will be deemed to have taken effect upon completion of agreed tasks as they progress.

iv. All fees are subject to Value Added Tax at the rates applicable at the times of issue of invoices. Unpaid invoices will be reissued to include any changes of VAT rate should this circumstance arise after such an issue of invoice and before payment of that invoice.

v. Payments are to be made as agreed at the time of confirmation that Safety and Health Management Services are to be provided and agreed in writing.

vi. Overdue accounts after and agreed period for payment may be subject to surcharges at the rates set out at 8.2 below without further notices being given.

vii. The Safety and Health Management Advisors shall not be liable for any loss of profit, revenue (including delayed revenue), business interruption or indirect or consequential loss, whether caused by negligence or breach of contract, incurred by The Company.

 

7. Expenses outside Safety and Health Management Advisors fees

Where additional expenses are incurred, The Company shall reimburse the Safety and Health Management Advisors accordingly. 

a. 7.1 Examples include; course administration costs will added to training fees. Travelling and other subsistence or other ancillary expenses reasonably incurred in consequence of the proper performance of our obligations may be claimed as agreed in advance. 

b. 7.2 Upon request, the Safety and Health Management Advisors shall provide The Company with receipts, vouchers or other evidence of actual payment of such expenses as The Company may reasonably require, subject to their availability and (within the view of the Safety and Health Management Advisors) other reasonable circumstances, which may prevail. 

 

8. Late Payment

If The Company fails to make any payment due to the Safety and Health Management Advisors under Clauses 6 and 7 on each due date then, without prejudice to any other right or remedy available to the Safety and Health Management Advisors, the Safety and Health Management Advisors shall be entitled to:

i. Terminate this Agreement by giving written notice to The Company provided that The Company fails to make the due payment within 3 working days after receiving written a final notice from the Safety and Health Management Advisors, giving full particulars of the payment due and requiring such payment to be made within 3 working days; and

ii. Impose a surcharge of 8% above the prevailing Bank of England interest rate upon the occasion of the payment becoming overdue and at 8% per month (both before and after any judgement) on the amount unpaid, until payment in full is made. A part of a month will be treated as a full month for the purpose of calculations; outstanding surcharges already applied will form part of an accrued outstanding amount for each and every monthly calculation. 

 

9. Breakdown of costs and conditions for additional services and expenses beyond the above agreed terms.

i. Professional fees for provision of services will be based upon £*** per day per person (this may vary depending upon the type of professional services provided and will be confirmed with each contract).

ii. A working day, for the purposes of ensuring the safety and well being of Advisors shall be regarded as 8 hours. 

iii. Fees for any period of providing Advisory services which exceeds 8 hours may be charged x 1.5 pro-rata to the daily rate up to 12 hours after which the rate for providing Advisory services will be increased to double the basic rate (pro-rata).

iv. Any part-day of service provision by the Safety and Health Management Advisors, such as for attending at meetings or other forms of consultative duties of 2 hours or less and involve travelling of up to 1 hour in each direction shall be charged at the rate of  ½ of one day. 

v. Where services are provided in excess of 4 hours in travelling to meetings and / or whilst engaged in meetings or other forms of consultative duties, though less than 8 hours may be charged as a full day unless otherwise agreed in advance. 

vi. Working hours may be capped as may be seen fit, for the purposes of the health, safety and health and welfare of both the Advisor, and for others, who may be affected as a result of a lower level of service as a result of fatigue or for any other similar reasons which may affect their health, safety and health or efficiency. Such a decision may also take into account circumstances of work and/or driving safety and hours worked or to be worked on previous and subsequent days. The decision of the Safety and Health Management Advisors regarding reasonable hours and duties will be final.

vii. When relevant, it shall entirely be the responsibility of The Company to ensure that there is a sufficient provision of safety and health officer/advisor cover for all aspects of this contract in terms of working hours, welfare requirements, geography associated with the tasks to be undertaken and associated work-load. The Safety and Health Management Advisors will not be held responsible for any periods or for geographical areas insufficiently provided for, due to the lack of sufficient safety and health officer/advisor presence as a result of decisions made by The Company whether for financial reasons or otherwise.

viii. Travelling charges will be at the rate of .45p per mile or at cost for any other forms of transport. For other forms of transport, standard class tickets will be sought as a first option but where necessary for expedience, higher-class tickets may be purchased in order to enable them to meet commitments. Should an advisor wish to make a voluntary upgrade, they may do so and will pay the difference in fare themselves. Should a higher standard of transport service be opted for as a voluntary act, The Health and Safety Advisors will seek only re-charge at the standard rate.

ix. Any additional charges, such as toll/ferry fees will be regarded as an additional and legitimate charge without further reference to The Company.

x. Subsistence for meals and accommodation will be re-charged at cost. Subsistence may include any necessary breakfasts, lunches, dinners or snacks if substantial meals cannot be obtained for any reason. Meals may be purchased and claimed if The Company does not otherwise provide food/drink, if the food available is not of a suitable standard to the individual Safety and Health Management Advisor or does not meet the Safety and Health Management Advisor’s dietary requirements. Further refreshments may be claimed as may be necessary, dependant upon prevailing circumstances (ie due to hot or cold weather). 

xi. Accommodation must be of a good standard of comfort, hygiene, ability to take rest, ability to undertake administration work, availability of food and privacy/modest. Room sharing is not an acceptable standard. If any accommodation is provided by The Company, which does not meet minimum standards, the Safety and Health Management Advisor may without notice seek their own alternative accommodation/meals and re-charge the costs to The Company without liability for any losses incurred by The Company by so doing.

xii. The Safety and Health Management Advisor will not be held responsible for the high cost of meals due to local circumstances or at hotels, which might arise from time to time, though they will endeavour to manage such budget issues to a reasonable level.

xiii. Receipts will be obtained wherever possible to support any claims. The Safety and Health Management Advisor does not consider that lack of receipts due to circumstances beyond their control; insufficient availability of information on any receipts or lack of quality on any receipts is their responsibility. Copies of receipts may be produced upon request. 

 

10. Termination

a. Without limitation both Parties may terminate this Agreement with immediate effect by giving written notice to the other Party under the circumstances outlined below at 10.i to 10.vi. If the other Party any relevant Party, whilst working towards the same purposes: 

i. commits any breach of this Document of Agreement (including late payment under Clause 8) and, in the case of a breach which is capable of remedy, fails to remedy it within 3 days’ after receiving written notice giving full particulars of the breach and requiring it to be remedied; or

ii. is incompetent, guilty of gross misconduct and/or any serious or persistent negligence in respect of his obligations hereunder; or

iii. fails to provide material information sufficient to undertake the tasks for the purposes of this agreement or to comply with legal requirements; or

iv. fails to follow practices according to the methods, materials, advice from the Safety and Health Management Advisors or other part or parts of the safety and health information supplied

v. If the Safety and Health Management Advisor considers, within their professional judgement that the work being undertaken is unsafe in any material way, or that by continuing they will breach Professional Codes of Practice (see below) or that to continue with the task is, in effect contributing to the occasion of such a potentially unsafe act or occurrence or if continuing to provide Safety or that by continuing  Advisory services will render The Company, or the Safety and Health Management Advisors to exposure to prosecution or claims for compensation, against their best advice, then under, the Safety and Health Management Advisors may immediately and on the spot, withdraw their services. 

vi. Under this eventuality at 10.v above, The Safety and Health Management Advisors will not be held liable for any adverse consequences of their withdrawal of services, no monies already paid will be refunded and all monies for work both already undertaken and for work not yet undertaken but previously agreed to undertake, plus expenses incurred including expenses incurred whilst waiting to make re-arranged travel from the place where work is taking place, will become due for payment  forthwith as if the whole contract were completed.

 vii. PROVIDED ALWAYS that The Company may not terminate this Agreement solely for the reason of the Safety and Health Management Advisors’ short term absence through illness or injury unless such illness or injury prevents the Safety and Health Management Advisors from effectively providing any Advisory Services to The Company for the purposes of the Agreement. In the event of this type of occurence of being unable to provide services, then The Company may discontinue this agreement, fees which would have become due will not be applied, monies for services already provided will become payable and any fees already paid for services yet to be undertaken will be repaid, less fees for services already provided. 

 

11. Substitution, Postponement and Cancellation

The Safety and Health Management Advisors may substitute another competent person to undertake the agreed work or may use the services of another such competent person to assist with the agreed work without notice. They may also postpone or cancel the provision of such services due to unforeseen circumstances such as illness, unforeseen travel delays or cancellations, severe weather and the like, as follows;

i. Where the Safety and Health Management Advisors have incurred expenses, which are not returnable, they shall be reimbursed by The Company but no other charges will be made.

ii. The Company and The Safety and Health Management Advisors will discuss whether to set another occasion for delivery of the service and should an occasion be mutually agreed upon, these terms and conditions will once again apply as if new and services will be provided in accordance with them.

iii. Should it not be possible to reach an agreement to rearrange another occasion for delivery of services, then no fault may be attributed to either party and no payment for fees or compensation will be applicable. 

 iv. Upon occasion when it is not possible to arrange for cancellation or substitution for the provision of services, such as due described above at 11 due to unforeseeable circumstances, The Safety and Health Management Advisors shall not be held liable for any adverse consequences which might arise to The Company. 

 

12. Confidential Information and Copyright

i. Both Parties shall at all times keep confidential (and take reasonable steps to procure that its employees and agents shall keep confidential) and shall not at any time for any reason disclose or permit to be disclosed to any person or otherwise make use of or permit to be made use of any information relating to the other Party’s business methods, plans, systems, finances, projects, trade secrets or provision of products or services to which it attaches confidentiality or in respect of which it holds an obligation to a third party. 

ii. All documents, notes, images, electronically recorded information of any type unless copyright is held by others, compiled for the client by the Safety and Health Management Advisors are subject to copyright and may not be copied in any way or passed to any other party or used for any other purpose (including further occurrences of the same service, event or occasion) without express permission from the Safety and Health Management Advisors. Authorised usage of copying such documentation or parts of such documentation will include any legitimate needs such as providing to enforcement and licensing bodies but they in turn may not make any use of or copies of the documentation in whole or in part or publish in any way such documentation without express permission from the Safety and Health Management Advisors. Any breaches of this copyright will be subject to substantial financial fees. Legitimate use of copyright held by The Safety and Health Management Advisors may by provided by them, subject to agreement which may include payment of fees to licence them to do so. 

iii. The Safety and Health Management Advisors give assurances that any documents provided to them whilst engaged in providing a service to The Company, whether from The Company or from other organisations or contractors will similarly be treated as being confidential and may not be used or passed to other parties in any way which is not permitted due to copyright or other purposes of confidentiality except as are intended for the legitimate and intended use of the information provided

 iv. Disclosure of the engagement for services, undertaken by The Health and Safety Advisors for The Company for commercial promotion purposes or by The Company of the engagement of services by The Health and Safety Advisors shall not be regarded as confidential information for this purpose unless previously agreed.

 

13. Tax Liabilities

i. The Safety and Health Management Advisor warrants and represents to The Company, that The Safety  Organisation Limited holds company registration number 07343160.    

ii. The Safety and Health Management Advisor undertakes to The Company that they will:

a) pay all relevant UK tax and National Insurance contributions in relation to payments made to them by The Company pursuant to this Agreement; and

 b) indemnify The Company in respect of any claims that may be made by the relevant authorities against The Company in respect of tax, National Insurance or similar contributions relating to the Advisory Services.

 

14. Notice

a. All notices to be given under this Agreement by either Party to the other shall be communicated in writing and shall be served by mailing or emailing to the last known address of the other Party and any receipt thereof should be acknowledged by the other party. 

b. Nothing in this Agreement shall render the Safety and Health Management Advisors, an employee, agent or partner of The Company and the Safety and Health Management Advisors shall not hold themselves as such. 

c. Neither party will be liable for any failure or delay in performance under this contract to the extent such failure or delay was caused by Force Majeure. For the purposes of this contract, Force Majeure shall mean any event outside of the reasonable control of either party, such as war, flood, government action, industrial action, National Mourning. The party who is unable to perform or is delayed in their performance must give the other notification of the Force Majeure as soon as possible during or after its occurrence. The parties shall try to agree to a mutually convenient course of action. 

 

15. Applicable Law and Jurisdiction

 i. This Agreement shall be governed by and construed in accordance with the laws of England and Wales.

ii. The Parties agree to submit to the [exclusive] [non-exclusive] jurisdiction of the courts of England and Wales. 

iii. No-one who is not a party to this contract has any benefit or right to enforce any terms of this contract.

iv. Variations to this Agreement can only be made in writing by the agreement of both the parties. 

 

IOSH  Codes of Conduct  IOSH Logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Foreword

 

This publication is divided into three parts:

 

Part 1

Code of Conduct

Part 2

Code of Conduct – Guidance

Part 3

IOSH Disciplinary Procedure

IOSH has been granted a Royal Charter to act in the interests of the general public benefit.

IOSH’s Code of Conduct (“the Code”) is a public document. It has at its heart the IOSH vision of “a world of work which is safe, healthy and sustainable”. It provides a strong ethical foundation for all our members working towards this vision.

The purpose of the Code is to help members demonstrate their value and reliability through adhering to high standards. The aim of the Guidance is to support members in their efforts to reach and maintain the standards, which are expressed as integrity, competence, respect and service. The standards are based on public expectations of professionalism. The meaning of each standard is presented as a set of obligations expressed as individual Code Points.

In scope, the Code applies principally to the activities of members as health and safety professionals. Members owe a primary loyalty to those at risk and should seek to ensure professional independence in the execution of their duties. In a profession, it is essential that members demonstrate integrity by being honest and acting fairly. Members must also avoid departing from the standards of integrity, competence and respect in their private lives in any way that could undermine public trust and confidence in the profession.

Wherever possible, IOSH has provided practice-based examples in the Guidance to help interpret the Code. Members may also contact IOSH staff with queries about the Code and how it relates to particular situations. IOSH will supplement the Guidance to address frequently-asked questions.

IOSH may investigate apparent or alleged non-compliance with the Code. Under Byelaw 8(1), all members have a duty to comply with the Code, which is effective from 04 March 2013. [Prior to that date the Code of Conduct approved by Council in September 2004 will apply.] Primarily the Code and Guidance are to assist members to do the right thing. When IOSH makes enquiries about members’ compliance with the Code, it will give them the opportunity to explain the reasonableness of their actions or omissions.

 

 

                             Part 1

Code of Conduct

 

1 Integrity

Members are required to:

 

1.1 Be honest;

1.2 Abide by the law;

1.3 Notify the Institution in writing promptly if they have

been

(a) convicted of a criminal offence by a Court or

(b) charged with a criminal offence contrary to health and safety legislation or

(c) adjudged bankrupt or have entered into a formal arrangement with their creditors; and

1.4 Avoid conflicts of interest wherever possible and if one arises promptly take appropriate steps to manage it.

 

2 Competence Members are required to:

2.1 Ensure they are competent to undertake proposed work;

2.2 Ensure persons working under their authority or supervision are competent to carry out the tasks assigned to them;

2.3 Undertake appropriate continuing professional development and record it in the manner prescribed by the Institution; and

2.4 Ensure that they make clients, employers and others who may be affected by their activities aware of their levels of competence.

 

3 Respect

Members are required to:

3.1 Cooperate fully with IOSH and abide by its Charter, Byelaws and Regulations;

3.2 Respect the rights and privacy of other people and organisations;

3.3 Cooperate with employers or clients in fulfilling their legal duties under the terms of their

employment or consultancy contracts;

3.4 Have due regard for the effect their professional activities may have on others;

3.5 Ensure that their professional and business activities are reasonable; and

3.6 Respond promptly and appropriately to disputes and complaints.

 

4 Service

Members are required to:

4.1 Ensure that the terms of appointment and scope of work are clearly recorded in writing;

4.2 Ensure that, where necessary, they have adequate professional indemnity insurance when providing consultancy services;

4.3 Carry out their professional work in a timely manner; 4.4 Ensure that professional advice is accurate,

proportionate and communicated in an appropriate

format;

4.5 Have due regard for levels of service and customer care

reasonably expected of them; and

4.6 Inform any person overruling or neglecting their

professional advice of the potential adverse consequences and keep a written record of the date, time and nature of this action.

 

                      Part 2

Code of Conduct – Guidance

Introduction

While this Guidance on the Code of Conduct is primarily addressed to IOSH’s members, it is also a public document. It provides explanation on how to apply the Code in practice. It will be updated as and when necessary; you should check the IOSH website for the latest version. In particular, investigation of future complaints will serve to clarify the interpretation of particular Code Points.

 

1 Integrity

Members are required to:

1.1 Be honest

You must be honest in discharging your duties as a health and safety professional. In litigation concerning other professionals, courts have decided that defendants have been dishonest if they knew that what they were doing would be regarded as dishonest by honest people.

Knowingly misleading anybody for financial or other gain that could not have been made honestly is most likely to be unacceptable. Examples include giving misleading information about qualifications and/or memberships, either to a prospective or current client, in order to gain or retain instructions, or to a prospective or current employer, in order to obtain employment or to attain a promotion or enhanced benefits. Assisting others to gain from the provision of false information is also unlikely to be acceptable. Examples include entering misleading details on policies, procedures, risk assessments or similar documentation or records.

You must be honest when you are ‘off duty’ too. However, IOSH will be reluctant to investigate if what is alleged, even if true, would not materially affect either your reputation as a health and safety professional, other members’ professional reputations or the reputation of IOSH itself.

1.2 Abide by the law

To gain public trust and confidence, you must obey the law in all aspects of your life. Convictions for some criminal offences may lead to disciplinary proceedings being taken against the convicted members by IOSH.

Historically IOSH has not given an exhaustive list of these criminal offences and we consider that doing so would be unwise. Generally, offences under health and safety legislation, and any involving dishonesty (see guidance to Code Point 1.1), are likely to lead to disciplinary proceedings. Sexual offences and offences involving violence are also likely to lead to disciplinary proceedings. Factors affecting IOSH’s decision whether to bring disciplinary proceedings will include the maximum sentence available on a first conviction for the offence, the extent to which you did or stood to profit from the offence and the extent of the actual or possible loss or harm to any victim.

1.3 Notify the Institution in writing promptly if they are (a) convicted of a criminal offence by a Court or

(b) charged with a criminal offence contrary to health

and safety legislation or

(c) adjudged bankrupt or enter into a formal

arrangement with their creditors.

Transparency in all the matters covered by this Code Point underpins the integrity standard.

(a) You must be proactive and give IOSH details of the offence(s) and the Court as a bare minimum, whether or not you are awaiting sentence and/or intend to appeal.

If you accept an offer of a fixed penalty for an illegal act, without reference to a court, then IOSH does not anticipate taking disciplinary proceedings. For instance, in England fines and driving licence endorsements for speeding may be concluded without court involvement. These matters fall outside the scope of Code Point 1.3(a). You should, however, reflect on the particular threat to your own professional reputation, the reputation of other members and the reputation of IOSH presented by such illegal acts.

(b) Being charged with an offence under health and safety legislation potentially could also affect the reputation of other members and/or IOSH itself, so self-reporting is imperative.

(c) You should give full details of all the circumstances: the reasons why you were unable to pay your debts in full as and when they fell due; the steps you took to minimise losses to your creditors; and any reports prepared on your financial position, breaking down your assets and liabilities, including the nature of those liabilities. IOSH is likely to look more favourably on situations where your culpability for your predicament is low.

 

1.4 Avoid conflicts of interest wherever possible and if one arises promptly take appropriate steps to manage it.

Conflicts of interest occur where your judgment may be affected by more than one interest, meaning an interest in the outcome: what may happen as a result of your involvement. Something that could benefit one interest may be detrimental to the other interest. An interest may be personal or professional. You usually have a personal interest in being able to provide for yourself and any dependants. This should not be allowed to interfere with the professional interest of giving appropriate health and safety advice.

If you recognise a dangerous procedure but do not recommend a shutdown in case it ultimately leads to the closure of the company and your redundancy, then that could point to a lack of integrity. Similarly, as a consultant, if you are aware that your recommendations are not being implemented, but you continue to advise the organisation for the fee income you derive, then that may be similarly questionable.

You are unlikely to be able to avoid having a personal interest in earning a living but should be able to put the welfare of the workforce or others affected by your activities first. Where you are acting as an expert witness in judicial proceedings the overriding objective will be to assist the decision-maker to deal with the case justly. If you take on the role of giving expert witness evidence, you should disclose any previous or continuing relationship that you have with any of the parties in the case at the time you are instructed and in any report prepared for the case.

The conflicts that you are required to avoid include situations such as accepting responsibility for advising both parties to a contract. This is because the interests of the parties are competing interests that are in conflict, as each wants the best outcome for them. If you advise company A on selecting an external training provider and company B on tendering for providing training services to A, without disclosing to A or B that you act for the other, then that is likely to lead to a breakdown in trust and the possibility of complaint. A wants the best value it can get for its training budget and B wants to win custom at the highest rate possible. If the full extent of your involvement becomes known, A and B are likely to doubt that you could have at all times acted in their best interests and may resent you earning two fees. Indeed both may regard the second fee as an inappropriate secret profit made by exploitation.

Conflicts of interest may also arise through the offer or acceptance of inducements. Inducements can include gifts, hospitality, preferential treatment and inappropriate appeals to friendship or loyalty. An inducement could affect your professional independence. You should not encourage any inducements which a reasonable observer may perceive to be factors that could affect your or another member’s objectivity, and thus the health and safety of others.

There will be occasions where people approach you for a professional opinion that implicitly agrees with their interest. For example, a relative or friend wants you to give expert evidence in judicial proceedings for which the friend or relative’s interest is in an outcome favourable to them, which may not be a fair one. Even if you disclose your relationship and satisfy yourself that you are giving your genuine opinion that coincidentally favours your relative or friend, there is a real danger that the perception will be that you have allowed your objectivity to be clouded by family or friendship. If you fail to disclose this conflict of interest, it may look like you are concealing material information that undermines your credibility as an expert. Such concealment could point towards a lack of integrity. You need to consider whether, for professional reasons, you need to decline to take on certain work in the first place.

If a conflict of interest arises, you should take appropriate steps to manage it. This may involve informing parties of the conflict and seeking their approval for adjustments to the situation designed either to remove the conflict entirely or significantly reduce its actual impact. Best practice, before continuing to act, is to seek written confirmation from each affected party that they have considered your disclosure and whether to take advice from an alternative source. In some circumstances the conflict may be of such a nature as to prevent a reasonable observer from concluding the situation can be managed satisfactorily. If so, you may need to consider ceasing to act for a party and possibly withdraw completely. When in doubt you should contact IOSH to discuss the matter.

 

2 Competence Members are required to:

2.1 Ensure they are competent to undertake proposed work.

Competence is a combination of knowledge, skills, experience and recognition of the limits of your capabilities. Knowledge can be gained or developed by studying for qualifications, but a qualification, by itself, is not evidence of competence. It must be enhanced by skills and knowledge that you develop through experience.

For example, as a health and safety practitioner you will have studied the harmful effects of noise along with prevention and control strategies for noise. You may not, however, have been taught the skills or have had the experience to be competent to undertake a detailed noise survey. In this case you would seek the services of a competent person in noise assessment or attend the appropriate course and gain experience to raise your competence to an appropriate level to undertake the survey.

If you provide expert witness services, you must take particular care to meet the requirements of the legal jurisdiction where you are providing them. Court rules may specify a number of mandatory statements and declarations for inclusion in reports. Members are strongly encouraged to undertake preparation for and familiarisation with the role of expert witness. Your overriding duty will be to the Court rather than to any person instructing you or with an interest in the outcome of the proceedings. Where a party to a case regards your evidence as unfavourable to their desired outcome then that party may seek to discredit you. If you do not demonstrate a grasp of both the duties of an expert witness and the Court rules that apply to your evidence, then this is one possible line of attack on your competence.

2.2 Ensure persons working under their authority or supervision are competent to carry out the tasks assigned to them.

Where you are responsible for managing or supervising individuals, you are required to ensure that they are competent to carry out the tasks assigned to them. This may include: determining whether an individual is competent when recruited to a role; engaging the services of a consultant; or managing a team of advisors who provide a range of functions for an employer. It may also include making arrangements for

2.3

persons under your authority to undertake appropriate Continuing Professional Development to maintain their level of competence.

It is advisable, as a supervisor or manager, to have a clear idea of the range of competences present in your team to avoid placing individuals in a situation where they may feel obliged to undertake a task, even when they are not competent to do so.

Undertake appropriate continuing professional development and record it in the manner prescribed by the Institution.

Competence is not attained through qualification alone. You should maintain and improve your competence by participating in Continuing Professional Development (CPD) activities throughout your professional career.

The CPD regulations require chartered fellows, chartered members and technician members to undertake a programme of CPD. You should document your CPD through the IOSH system. CPD is not limited to attending training events and conferences. You are encouraged to reflect on all aspects of your professional activities, to identify positive areas of practice that have led to new insights, and to identify gaps in knowledge. Further advice on how to maintain your CPD is available from IOSH. You should expect IOSH to take a look at your compliance with the CPD regulations if it has cause to make any enquiries about your compliance with other parts of the Code.

Ensure that they make clients, employers and others who may be affected by their activities aware of their levels of competence.

There may be occasions when you are asked to carry out a specific task that requires specialist skills or knowledge that are beyond the limits of your competence. In these circumstances you should inform the client or employer of the limitations of your competence and consider the following options.

(a) Decline the work, indicating where specific competences are required. It is recommended that you identify a suitable person or organisation with such competences to complete the work.

(b) Agree to carry out the work, provided it is supervised and/or peer-reviewed by another suitably competent person. This may be the best way to extend your current competences, if you desire that.

(c) Agree to carry out the work, but with your initial advice subject to review in the light of wider

2.4 Experience. This option may be appropriate for novel situations for both you and your client or employer, and where the risks to all involved are assessed and acceptable. You should make efforts to avoid such situations and learn how to minimise them, but they may be the only realistic option in certain circumstances.

Remember that stopping or delaying work to consult others with appropriate competences is also a safe option in most cases. Working outside your competence area may have legal implications to you and the employer, and also to your continued membership of IOSH.

 

3 Respect

Members are required to:

3.1 Cooperate fully with IOSH and abide by its Charter, Byelaws and Regulations.

Cooperation with IOSH includes providing information as requested. For example, you may be asked to provide copies of letters, emails, advertising material, business cards, policy and procedures documents, risk assessments or reports. You could be asked to clarify CPD details by providing copies of attendance certificates to conferences or courses following an audit of your CPD. If any doubt about your financial propriety is raised, you may be asked for financial records. Code Point 1.3 already requires that you notify IOSH of specified criminal actions or allegations, and IOSH may request further details concerning these.

You must have regard to the reputation and good standing of IOSH and other members. You should avoid conduct that brings you and/or other members and / or IOSH into disrepute; and/or is prejudicial to the interests of IOSH. Such conduct may include injuring the reputation of a member and inappropriate behaviour, such as using foul language, when representing IOSH at an event. Conduct that is prejudicial to the interests of IOSH may include using the IOSH logo or name without permission for financial gain.

3.2 Respect the rights and privacy of other people and organisations.

As an occupational safety and health professional, disagreements will happen from time to time. To avoid making disagreements personal, it is important to remember that is often acceptable to criticise ideas but often unacceptable to criticise individuals, particularly in an offensive manner. Respecting other people includes behaving in an appropriate manner. Inappropriate behaviour includes the use of foul language or acting in an intimidating or threatening way.

Respecting an individual’s rights will include ensuring that you do not discriminate on the grounds of age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation. Race includes colour, nationality and ethnic or national origin. You should not discriminate on the grounds of socio-economic status either.

You must specifically respect the privacy of the individual. Information technology may have an adverse affect on an individual’s privacy, and advice should be sought on data protection legislation when storing personal information.

3.3 Cooperate with employers or clients in fulfilling their legal duties under the terms of their employment or consultancy contracts.

As a competent person, you have an obligation to provide appropriate advice concerning the health, safety and welfare of employees and others in assisting employers and clients in fulfilling their legal duties. Employers may from time to time request further information to clarify advice given and, where this is clearly within the terms of your contract, you have an obligation to provide it.

3.4 Have due regard for the effect their professional activities may have on others.

You should take all reasonable care to maintain the confidentiality of personal, managerial, technical, commercial and/or security information obtained as a result of your professional activity.

Where information obtained as a result of the professional activity relates directly to the health and safety of individuals, you should endeavour to ensure that such information is communicated to the individuals concerned by working through the information owners.

3.5 Ensure that their professional and business activities are reasonable.

The following are examples of unreasonable behaviour, lack of transparency and impartiality that are likely to be considered to be a breach of 3.5:

- Providing inappropriately bundled services to clients,

causing them to pay for things they do not need;

- Failing to respond to a client who had repeatedly

requested a response relating to work undertaken;

- Recommending suppliers of, say, personal protective

equipment, or the services of any third party, without mentioning any benefit, such as commission for the introduction, that could accrue to you (this may fall under Code Point 1.4); and

- Making claims of success rates (either in assisting with contractor accreditation scheme applications or for examination candidates tutored or trained by you or by your organisation) that cannot be substantiated and/or are not adjusted from time to time in order to reflect the latest outcomes.

3.6 Respond promptly and appropriately to disputes and complaints.

A dispute can include a disagreement or a difference of opinion between two or more parties. A complaint is an expression of dissatisfaction requiring a response.

Completely ignoring a complaint or failure to manage a dispute, whether you feel it is justified or not, is generally not acceptable. As a professional you are expected to take steps to resolve disputes and respond to complaints whenever possible. Consideration should also be given to the guidance under Code Point 3.2.

 

4 Service

Members are required to:

4.1 Ensure that the terms of appointment and scope of work are clearly recorded in writing.

It is possible to have a legally binding oral contract. The problem in the event of any dispute, however, is that it is one person’s word against another’s.

One of the most likely causes of a dispute is a lack of contractual clarity. Professional indemnity insurers will expect written agreements because defending claims for inadequate professional service based on oral contracts will be harder. Written agreements should aid debt recovery. If you are seeking to recover fees via a Court process and the client contests, why should your word automatically be preferred over the client’s? If you

expect to be believed as a ‘professional’, you may find that a Judge cannot understand why you – the professional – have acted without a written agreement.

4.2 Ensure that, where necessary, they have adequate professional indemnity insurance when providing consultancy services.

Independent consultants will require professional indemnity insurance (PII) cover. Further advice on the recommended levels of cover can be obtained by contacting an insurance broker.

A member who is in full-time employment or working for a larger consultancy will probably be covered by the organisation’s indemnity cover. Members, however, have an obligation to confirm this with their employer.

4.3 Carry out their professional work in a timely manner.

4.4 Delays in issuing reports, conducting inspections, producing policies and procedures may have implications on the health, safety and welfare of employees. Agreeing the terms and scope of the work in advance, in accordance with Code Point 4.1, will help clarify the time requirements. Delays in work can happen due to unforeseen circumstances. If so, members are advised to inform the employer or client at the earliest opportunity so that they can seek other sources of advice if they need an urgent response.

Ensure that professional advice is accurate, proportionate and communicated in an appropriate format.

Minor mistakes do not generally amount to a breach of the Code but may result in complaints or disputes, which fall under Code Point 3.6. Other matters may have more serious consequences. For example, citing legislation inaccurately in a report could have serious implications in the workplace and may be viewed differently. If a Court makes a finding that you have been negligent when providing professional advice, then that will not automatically lead IOSH to disciplinary proceedings against you. In deciding what action, if any, to take, IOSH will look at the wider circumstances. If you are practising as a consultant and pay damages awarded against you, then that would be a mitigating factor. Hence the need to have adequate PII cover as required at Code Point 4.2 above. Aggravating factors could include inability to pay damages awarded and any failure to comply with Code Points 2.1 and 2.3.

 

A proportionate approach to professional advice is required. For example, over-stating the risk may lead to excessive expenditure or further consultancy not necessarily needed. The format used when providing professional advice will vary. In most situations best practice will be to provide written advice, or written confirmation of advice provided orally, as soon as is reasonably practicable. You should bear in mind that, for PII purposes, it is highly desirable to have an audit trail of information received and advice given, in order to deal efficiently with any subsequent claims.

4.5 Have due regard for levels of service and customer care reasonably expected of them.

You should keep appropriate records. This includes contemporaneous attendance notes for detailed telephone conversations. In particular, any significant changes to the originally agreed service level and payment terms should be documented. Inertia when it comes to recording agreed variations could cause future disputes.

You should also have some type of records management system. If you use external storage facilities you need to know exactly what you have sent there and be able to retrieve records efficiently. You should have regard to other IOSH publications such as the Consultancy Good Practice Guide.

Where a client has contracted out a service to you, it would be inappropriate to then further sub-contract that service to another party without the client’s express agreement. This would be less appropriate still if the sub-contractor’s level of competence was lower than your own. (See also Code Points 2.2 and 3.5.)

You should consider giving advance notice to clients of periods where you will be unavailable in order to manage their expectations. Good communication can make complaints far less likely. If you expect to observe religious or cultural festivals that are not public holidays, then letting clients have early notification of dates you will be unavailable is likely to aid relations. If you practise on your own and know in advance that you will be unavailable for more than a few working days then think about making arrangements to prevent the impression forming that you do not answer letters, return calls, etc. It is also a good idea to have some contingency plans for unexpected absences. A common cause of complaints to professional bodies is failure to

respond to clients. A common cause of these complaints escalating to disciplinary proceedings is failure by members to respond to their professional bodies. If you are unable to work normally you need to be able to depend on somebody to relay that news on your behalf.

If you are moving you should ensure continuity of service is not broken. You need to consider postal re- direction for the maximum period if you have not informed all current and recent clients of your change of address in advance.

4.6 Inform any person overruling or neglecting their professional advice of the potential adverse consequences and keep a written record of the date, time and nature of this action.

As a health and safety professional, you may find employers or clients occasionally either ignore your advice or fail to act on all of it within your recommended timescales. There can be times when the employer or client is ignoring advice on something that presents an imminent danger to the workforce. Health and safety professionals are required to exercise professional independence and to remain as objective as they can. If you believe your advice is not being followed, you should take reasonable steps to make the person overruling your advice aware of the potential consequences. This would normally be in writing, and you should ask for a confirmation receipt. If this does not work, then you are expected to escalate the matter to the next tier of management in a further effort to see changes implemented. In a situation where you have a genuine concern that death or serious injury might result, then the right thing to do is contact an enforcement agency such as the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). You are expected to “do the right thing” regardless of the possible cost to you. In extreme cases, this might mean resigning or ending a relationship with a client.

HSE provides information on the Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998, which is designed to protect workers who ‘blow the whistle’ about a wrong-doing. A wrong-doing may include where you have a reasonable belief that your disclosure tends to show one or more of the following: a criminal offence; a breach of a legal obligation; a miscarriage of justice; a danger to the health and safety of any individual; damage to the environment; or the deliberate covering- up of information tending to show any of the above.

 

Part 3

Disciplinary Procedure

Foreword

The Board of Trustees has made these Regulations that are required under Byelaw 8 ‘Discipline’. Council has approved these Regulations. They come into force on 04 March 2013.

Under its Royal Charter, IOSH acts in the interests of the general public benefit by doing what may be necessary to maintain and improve the professional status of its members. Accordingly members must follow the IOSH Code of Conduct, the purpose of which is to enable them to uphold standards of integrity, competence, respect and service so that there is public trust and confidence in them and IOSH itself.

IOSH will provide guidance explaining how complaints may be made against IOSH members. It is important that the facility to complain exists but complaints will only lead to disciplinary proceedings in serious cases.

 

1 Interpretation and definitions

1.1 In these Regulations, unless the context otherwise requires:

1.1.1 Words importing the singular number only shall include the plural number and vice-versa;

1.1.2 Words importing the masculine gender only shall include the feminine gender, and shall be taken to include reference to organisations;

1.1.3 Words denoting persons shall include organisations.

1.2 Unless the context otherwise requires, words and expressions used in these Regulations shall have the meanings given to them in the Charter and Byelaws of IOSH, and the following words and expressions shall have the meanings set out below:

- ‘the Complainant' means the person who made the allegation of misconduct and may be an employee or appointee of IOSH;

- 'the Director' means the Executive Director Membership or another Executive Director of IOSH who may delegate his role under these Regulations to an employee or appointee of IOSH, so references to the Director within these Regulations shall be read as references to the employee or appointee to whom the Director has delegated;

- 'Hearing' means a meeting of either the Disciplinary Committee or the Appeal Committee at which the Director and the Subject may be heard as prescribed by these Regulations;

- 'a Higher Penalty' means removal from the Board of Trustees and/or Council and/or any other IOSH committee or suspension of membership of IOSH or expulsion from membership of IOSH;

- 'Misconduct' means conduct that

(i) breaches the Code of Conduct and/or

(ii) amounts to unacceptable professional conduct

within the standards expected in the health

and safety profession and/or

(iii) may bring IOSH or the health and safety

profession into disrepute and/or

(iv) is prejudicial to the interests of IOSH and/or

(v) is in breach of a decision made, or penalty

imposed under these Regulations;

- 'the Professional Ethics Committee' means the

Professional Ethics Committee or such other committee as the Board of Trustees may from time to time authorise;

- 'the Public Interest' means the interests of the general public benefit and 'what is in the Public Interest' means what is necessary in order to maintain public trust and confidence in IOSH members and IOSH;

- ‘the Relevant Committee’ means the Professional Ethics Committee, Disciplinary Committee or Appeal Committee all of which shall make decisions under these Regulations by simple majority; and

- ‘the Subject’: means a member of IOSH who is the subject of an allegation of misconduct.

 

2 Aim

These Regulations set out the procedure to be followed where an allegation of misconduct is made against a member of IOSH. The aim of these Regulations is fairness, so the fact that any allegation of misconduct is made will not automatically lead to the imposition of any penalty. A member will be given reasonable opportunity to put their case where the allegation is suitable for investigation. In performing their roles under these Regulations the Director and the Relevant Committee shall have regard to the Public Interest, proportionality and any current policy document concerning these Regulations published by IOSH.

 

3 General provisions

3.1 Time limits

The Director may, at his discretion, vary any time limit set out in these Regulations.

3.2 Requirements for an allegation of misconduct

3.2.1 An allegation of misconduct must be made in writing,

or a written summary of it agreed between the Director and the Complainant, and accompanied by copies of any documentation relevant to it.

3.2.2 IOSH shall not be obliged to investigate an allegation of misconduct if

(i) the allegation is made anonymously; or

(ii) the alleged incident occurred more than one year

prior to receipt of the allegation.

3.3 Legal proceedings

3.3.1 The Director may at his discretion suspend

investigation of an allegation of misconduct under these Regulations where the existence of any criminal investigation or other legal proceedings indicates that this is appropriate.

3.3.2 In considering an allegation of misconduct, the Relevant Committee shall be entitled to rely on a certificate of criminal conviction and/or transcript of the criminal court’s judgment as evidence of the offence committed, or the decision of a civil court or tribunal as evidence of the issues determined by that court or tribunal.

3.4 Standard of proof

Subject to the provisions of these Regulations the Relevant Committee may find an allegation of misconduct proven or confirm a finding that an allegation of misconduct is proven provided it is satisfied on the evidence available that it is more likely than not to be true.

3.5 Precautionary suspension

3.5.1 If the Subject is charged with or convicted of a

criminal offence under health and safety legislation or any other serious criminal offence the Director may suspend him with immediate effect.

3.5.2 Unless determined otherwise by the Director, a member who is suspended shall not, throughout the period of suspension, be permitted to use any designation or initials appropriate to membership, and may not attend or vote at any general meetings of the members.

3.5.3 Unless determined otherwise by the Director, the period of suspension shall continue until the conclusion of any disciplinary proceedings.

3.5.4 A member who is suspended may make written representations to the Director within 10 working days of the suspension being imposed.

3.5.5 A member who is suspended may apply in writing to the Director for the suspension to be reviewed every four weeks.

 

4 Initial stages

4.1 Decision by the Director whether to investigate or not 4.1.1 Within 15 working days of receiving an allegation of

misconduct the Director shall:

(i) contact the Complainant to acknowledge receipt;

and

(ii) assess whether it is necessary to seek any further

information relating to the allegation of misconduct from the Complainant or elsewhere and if so request it.

4.1.2 As soon as is reasonably practicable the Director shall decide whether to investigate the allegation of misconduct.

4.1.3 If the Director decides not to investigate he shall send the Complainant reasons for his decision in writing.

4.1.4 If the Director decides to investigate he shall send the Subject formal written notice of the allegation of misconduct, together with copies of any documentation submitted by the Complainant or obtained from any other source that affected his decision to investigate, and require a written response from the Subject.

4.1.5 Within 20 working days of receiving a notice from the Director in accordance with paragraph 4.1.4, the Subject shall submit a written response stating whether he admits or denies the allegation of misconduct, and must provide copies of any documentation upon which he wishes to rely.

 

4.2 Decision by the Director whether to refer to the Professional Ethics Committee or not

4.2.1 After 22 working days have elapsed from the date of notice given in accordance with paragraph 4.1.4 the Director shall decide whether to refer the allegation of misconduct and any response from the Subject for consideration by the Professional Ethics Committee.

4.2.2 If the Director decides not to refer to the Professional Ethics Committee he shall send the Complainant and the Subject reasons for his decision in writing.

4.2.3 If the Director decides to refer the allegation of misconduct to the Professional Ethics Committee he shall provide the Professional Ethics Committee with copies of the documentation sent to the Subject in accordance with paragraph 4.1.4 together with copies of documentation received from the Subject (if received).

 

5 Professional Ethics Committee

5.1 Jurisdiction

The Professional Ethics Committee shall consider allegations of misconduct referred to it by the Director under paragraph 4.2.3.

5.2 Composition

The composition of the Professional Ethics Committee is prescribed in separate Regulations made pursuant to Byelaw 13.

5.3 Procedure

The Professional Ethics Committee shall make decisions based solely on documentation provided to it.

5.4 Powers

The Professional Ethics Committee may:

(a) adjourn on such terms as it considers appropriate; or

(b) dismiss the allegation of misconduct on the

grounds that there is no case to answer or that any further formal action under these Regulations is disproportionate; or

(c) if the Subject admits the allegation, either

(i) invite the Subject to make written

representations by way of mitigation and, after considering any representations received, provide guidance on his conduct, or issue a reprimand; or

(ii) if the Professional Ethics Committee considers that a Higher Penalty ought to be imposed, refer the matter to the Disciplinary Committee under paragraph 5.4(d); or

(d) refer the matter to be considered by the Disciplinary Committee.

5.5 Notification of decisions

5.5.1 The Professional Ethics Committee shall notify the

Director of its decision in writing within 10 working days of the decision being made. The notice must set out the reasons for the Professional Ethics Committee’s decision.

5.5.2 Within 10 working days of receipt of the Professional Ethics Committee’s decision, the Director must notify the Subject and the Complainant of the decision.

5.5.3 There is no right of appeal against the decision reached in paragraph 5.4 above.

 

6 Disciplinary Committee

6.1 Jurisdiction

The Disciplinary Committee shall consider matters referred to it by the Professional Ethics Committee in accordance with paragraph 5.4 (d) unless the Director elects to cancel the referral on any of the following grounds:

(a) the Subject has died; or

(b) in light of new information since the referral there

no longer appears to be a realistic prospect of a finding that the allegation of misconduct is proven; or

(c) for any other reason by reference to factors including the seriousness of the allegation it no longer appears to be in the Public Interest for a hearing to be held and both the Complainant and the Subject have had an opportunity to make representations to the Director about a possible cancellation.

6.2 Composition

6.2.1 The Disciplinary Committee shall consist of one IOSH

member and two independent members.

6.2.2 An individual will not be eligible to be appointed as a

member of the Disciplinary Committee if he has had any previous involvement in the matter or is a member of the IOSH Council or the IOSH Board of Trustees.

6.2.3 The Disciplinary Committee shall appoint one of the independent members as Chair.

6.3 Clerk

An employee or appointee of IOSH who has not previously been involved in the matter and who is not a member of the IOSH Council or the IOSH Board of Trustees shall act as clerk to the Disciplinary Committee.

6.4 Procedure

6.4.1 Subject to the following and to the provisions of

these Regulations, the Disciplinary Committee shall

determine its own procedure.

6.4.2 The Disciplinary Committee may adjourn at any time

to discuss decisions or determine a procedural query.

6.4.3 The Disciplinary Committee may obtain such legal,

technical or other advice as it thinks fit.

6.4.4 Any advice received by the Disciplinary Committee in

accordance with paragraph 6.4.3 shall be disclosed, before the Disciplinary Committee exercises any of the powers available to it under paragraph 6.6, to the Director and the Subject.

6.5 Hearing arrangements

6.5.1 The Disciplinary Committee shall hold a hearing to

consider the matter afresh. The case against the Subject shall be presented by the Director. The Subject and the Director may call witnesses in support of their cases.

6.5.2 The Subject shall be informed in writing of the substance of the allegations against him at least 30 working days before the hearing. Notice of the allegations must include the date and time of the hearing and be accompanied by copies of any documentation (including witness statements) to be considered at the hearing, together with details of any witnesses to be called by the Director.

6.5.3 At least 15 working days before the hearing, the Subject shall confirm in writing if he admits or denies the allegations, and provide copies of any documentation (including witness statements) on which he intends to rely, together with details of any witnesses to be called.

6.5.4 At least 10 working days before the hearing, the Clerk to the Disciplinary Committee shall circulate to Committee members and to the parties a bundle consisting of the documentation referred to at paragraphs 6.5.2 and 6.5.3, together with a copy of these Regulations.

6.5.5 The Disciplinary Committee may proceed in the absence of the Subject if:

(a) the Subject has been properly notified of the date and time of the hearing in accordance with paragraph 6.5.2; and

(b) it is satisfied that doing so is fair, taking account of any information given by or on behalf of the Subject balanced against the Public Interest.

6.5.6 The Subject may be represented at the hearing by a friend, legal or other representative.

6.5.7 Unless determined otherwise by the Disciplinary Committee, the hearing shall be open to the Complainant, IOSH members and to the general public. The Disciplinary Committee may exclude or expel any person from all or part of the hearing if that person disrupts, or is likely to disrupt, the hearing, or if fairness otherwise requires.

6.5.8 The Subject and the Director may question, at the hearing, witnesses called by the other party. The Disciplinary Committee may ask questions of any person present at the hearing. Unless determined otherwise by the Disciplinary Committee, only those witnesses whose details and statements have been provided to the other party in advance (in accordance with paragraphs 6.5.2 and 6.5.3 shall be entitled to speak at the hearing.

6.5.9 Unless determined otherwise by the Disciplinary Committee, evidence shall be taken in the following order:

- the Director will present the case against the Subject;

- the Subject will present his case;

- the Director will be invited to give a closing

statement;

- the Subject will be invited to give a closing

statement.

6.6 Powers

6.6.1 The Disciplinary Committee may:

(a) adjourn on such terms as it considers appropriate; or

(b) dismiss the allegation; or

(c) find the allegation proven, and may also by way of

imposing a penalty or penalties take any one or more of the following actions in respect of the Subject, on such terms as it thinks fit:

(i) provide guidance on his conduct;

(ii) issue him with a reprimand;

(iii) remove him from the Board of Trustees and/or

Council and/or any other IOSH committee as

applicable;

(iv) suspend his membership of IOSH; or; (v) expel him from membership IOSH.

6.6.2 Before imposing a penalty the Disciplinary Committee shall consider mitigation, if any, offered by the Subject.

6.6.3 If in the opinion of the Disciplinary Committee it is appropriate in the interests of fairness, the Disciplinary Committee may order IOSH or the Subject to contribute to the costs incurred by the other in the conduct of the hearing.

6.7 Notification of decisions

The Disciplinary Committee shall inform the Complainant, the Director and the Subject of its decision in writing within 10 working days of the decision being made. The notice must set out the reasons for the Disciplinary Committee’s decision, and, if appropriate, must inform the Subject of his right of appeal under paragraph 7.1.1.

 

7 Appeal Committee

7.1 Jurisdiction

7.1.1 The Subject may appeal against the decision of the

Disciplinary Committee to the Appeal Committee, by submitting full grounds of appeal in writing to the Director within 10 working days of receiving the Disciplinary Committee’s decision.

7.1.2 Examples of grounds of appeal include:

(a) serious errors in the procedures followed by the

Disciplinary Committee;

(b) the imposition of an unreasonably excessive

sanction by the Disciplinary Committee; or

(c) the emergence of new material evidence, which

could not reasonably have been submitted to the

Disciplinary Committee.

7.1.3 If the Director wishes to submit a response to the

Subject's grounds of appeal, he shall do so within 10 working days of receiving it.

7.2 Composition of Appeal Committee

7.2.1 The Appeal Committee shall consist of one IOSH

member and two independent members.

7.2.2 An individual will not be eligible to be appointed as a

member of the Appeal Committee if he has had any previous involvement in the matter or is a member of the IOSH Council or the IOSH Board of Trustees.

7.2.3 The Appeal Committee shall appoint one of the independent members as Chair.

7.3 Clerk

An employee or appointee of IOSH who has not previously been involved in the matter and who is not a member of the IOSH Council or the IOSH Board of Trustees shall act as clerk to the Appeal Committee.

7.4 Procedure

7.4.1 Subject to the following and to the provisions of

these Regulations, the Appeal Committee shall

determine its own procedure.

7.4.2 The Appeal Committee may adjourn at any time to

discuss decisions or determine a procedural query.

7.4.3 The Appeal Committee may obtain such legal,

7.4.4 Any advice received by the Appeal Committee in accordance with paragraph 7.4.3 shall be disclosed, before the Appeal Committee exercises any of the powers available to it under paragraph 7.6, to the Director and the Subject.

7.5 Hearing arrangements

7.5.1 The Appeal Committee shall hold a hearing to review

the Disciplinary Committee’s decision unless, exceptionally, the Appeal Committee determines that a full re-hearing is appropriate.

7.5.2 The Subject shall be informed in writing of the date and time of the hearing at least 30 working days in advance.

7.5.3 At least 10 working days before the hearing, the Clerk shall circulate to members of the Appeal Committee, the Subject and the Director copies of the Disciplinary Committee’s decision, the grounds of appeal submitted in accordance with 7.1.1, the response of the Director, if any, and a copy of these Regulations.

7.5.4 The Appeal Committee may proceed in the absence of the Subject if:

(a) the Subject has been properly notified of the date and time of the hearing in accordance with paragraph 7.5.2; and

(b) it is satisfied that doing so is fair, taking account of any information given by or on behalf of the Subject balanced against the Public Interest.

7.5.5 The Subject may be represented at the hearing by a friend, legal or other representative.

7.5.6 Unless determined otherwise by the Appeal Committee, the hearing shall be open to the Complainant, IOSH members and to the general public. The Appeal Committee may exclude or expel any person from all or part of the hearing if that person disrupts, or is likely to disrupt, the hearing, or if fairness otherwise requires.

7.5.7 The Subject may present his grounds of appeal and the Director may respond. The Appeal Committee may ask questions of any person present at the hearing.

7.5.8 If the Appeal Committee determines, in accordance with paragraph 7.5.1, that the appeal will be a full re-hearing, the re-hearing shall be conducted in accordance with the provisions of paragraph 6.5, and references to the Disciplinary Committee shall be read as references to the Appeal Committee.

technical or other advice as it thinks fit.

7. 6 Powers  The Appeal Committee may:

(a) adjourn on such terms as it considers appropriate; 9.1

Former members

This paragraph applies where:

or (a) an allegation of misconduct meeting the

(b) confirm the Disciplinary Committee's decision; or

(c) overturn the Disciplinary Committee's decision; or

(d) vary the Disciplinary Committee's decision with

any one or more of the actions that were available

to the Disciplinary Committee in paragraph

.7.6.1 (c) being available to the Appeal Committee

by way of imposing a penalty or penalties in

relation to the Subject on such terms as it sees fit. 9.2

7.6.2 Before imposing a penalty the Appeal Committee shall consider mitigation, if any, offered by the Subject.

7.6.3 If in the opinion of the Appeal Committee it is appropriate in the interests of fairness, the Appeal Committee may, order IOSH or the Subject to contribute to the costs incurred by the other in the conduct of the hearing.

 

8 Publication of disciplinary decisions

Unless the Relevant Committee determines otherwise, decisions made under paragraphs 5.4 (c) (i), 6.6 and 7.6 shall be published in the official magazine of IOSH and/or on its website. Unless requested in writing by the Complainant or by the witness concerned, the published decision shall not identify the complainant or any witnesses involved in the proceedings.

Requirements of paragraph 3.2.1 is required; and (b) the Subject has ceased to be a member of IOSH by the time the allegation of misconduct is received; and

(c) the allegation of misconduct relates to matters which occurred during the time the Subject was a member of IOSH.

The Director shall decide at his absolute discretion whether or not to investigate an allegation of misconduct falling within paragraph 9.1. If the Director decides to investigate the allegation of misconduct, then these Regulations shall apply to the Subject as if he had not ceased to be a member of IOSH.